How I Got Started

I started Butterfly gardening many years ago. My yard has been a progression over the years, and has made many transformations. Twenty years ago I experienced Hurricane Andrew. My yard and house were destroyed. We decided not to replace the pool screening and open up the backyard and put in some landscaping. That was the official beginning of my love for gardening in South Florida. I added a beautiful water garden years ago, and have been adding host and larvae plants for pollinators, mostly for the butterfly, for as many years as I can remember. I had my yard certified as a Natural Habitat, through the National Wildlife Foundation. To have a natural habitat you need to provide and meet certain requirements: 1. Provide a food source, 2. Provide a water source, 3. Cover, 4. A place to raise young. I try not to use any pesticides in my yard. I vermicompost and recycle as many of my food scraps as possible. If I had more land I would have a huge compost bin to recycle all my yard cuttings. Basically, I try to lessen my carbon footprint on this earth. In my own little world or backyard I try to provide an ecosystem in my water garden, provide birdbaths, birdfeeders, hummingbird nectar sources, feeders, puddling areas, host plants and nectar plants for butterflies and other pollinators. I am hoping to raise everyone’s awareness of the importance of saving our Butterflies, Blooms & Bees. Without them our world and food source will be in trouble. I hope you all enjoy my journey. I am not a Master Gardener, or Master Beekeeper, an Entomologist, or Journalists. I am simply a Backyard Gardener who is trying to lessen her Carbon Footprint of this Earth.

I hope you enjoy my blogs.

Sunday, August 12, 2012

Getting Back Up on the Horse

Or so the saying goes…. I finally went back into my beehives. I have to admit I was pretty nervous about it, but I knew I had to get back up on the horse. I did have a friend with me and I am very grateful that she is helping me. It made me relax to know that she was there to help me in case I needed it. It was also good to have a pair of younger eyes, to see the eggs etc. I did wear my complete bee suit, three layers of gloves, and my new bee boots. The bees did not sting me at all through the gloves for which I’m glad. I think the triple layers worked well. I washed my gloves even though they were goatskin leather, to get the bee sting pheromone off. They seemed to wash ok. So the irony is that I am completely covered from head to toe and they still sting me through the bee suit on the shoulder. It is so funny but the bees had never stung me in the ankles, usually just through the gloves. So I protect myself from head to toe and they find a new place to sting me in the shoulder. It is almost like they are laughing at me saying, “Ok you think you are going to keep us away with three layers of gloves, we will just find an easier place to get you!” I did have a slight local reaction, but no systemic reaction. I do believe that the reason I did have the anaphylactic reaction is that I just got too many stings that day. I just bought a B/P machine so that if I get more than one or two stings while in the hives I can take my B/P. If it drops, I stop for the day. I also forgot to mention that I had my epinephrine pen attached to my hip. I will never go into the hives again without my epi pen, and without someone home.

The hives looked pretty good. Hive #1 had pretty good laying pattern, good population, and a few hive beetles towards the back. There is a lot of bearding on the front of this hive. We didn’t see any eggs so I will be watching this hive in case it swarms.



Hive #2 still didn’t have a new queen. The old queen cells were broken down. We did find a few queen cups with open larvae so we gave that hive 4 bars of brood to make a new queen just in case they need it. Hive #3 & #4 looked good. Hive #4 is my strongest hive with the best laying queen. Unfortunately hive #5 that I started the last time I was in the hives didn’t make it. Hive #5 was the mixed origin divide that I did on July 21st when the anaphylactic reaction occurred. Unfortunately I had a cover on the hive that really didn’t allow good sunlight to enter, and I think the rain water was also getting into the hive. When we inspected it, it was full of wax moths, and small hive beetles, and larvae. There were some bees left but not enough to salvage the hive. I actually threw all the wax away and the hive. I took the top bars and placed them in my freezer to kill any larvae that might be hiding. I felt badly but I did not want that larvae infesting my other hives. The most important way to keep pests out of your hives is to make sure they are strong. Hive #5 unfortunately was not strong and I totally ignored it for three weeks because of what happened. You cannot do that with a TBH. Lesson learned!



The good news is that I was able to harvest many jars of honey that is always so appreciated. I don’t think I will ever take getting honey for granted. It is just amazing what a wonderful gift bees give us. We need to not take our bees for granted!

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